Nyhetsinnsamler

Fear Of Smart Contracts

Planet CC -

Babylon, 1772BC, about tea time. King Hammurabi is explaining the idea of laws to several learned persons. Hammurabi: So these laws will regulate how we go about our business in society, backed by the coercive power of the state. Learned…Read more ›

Dozens of organizations tell STM publishers: No new licenses

Creativecommons.org -

The keys to an elegant set of open licenses are simplicity and interoperability. CC licenses are widely recognized as the standard in the open access publishing community, but a major trade association recently published a new set of licenses and is urging its members to adopt it. We believe that the new licenses could introduce unnecessary complexity and friction, ultimately hurting the open access community far more than they’d help.

Today, Creative Commons and 57 organizations from around the world released a joint letter asking the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers to withdraw its model “open access” licenses. The association ostensibly created the licenses to promote the sharing of research in the scientific, technical, and medical communities. But these licenses are confusing, redundant, and incompatible with open access content published under other public licenses. Instead of developing another set of licenses, the signatories urge the STM Association to recommend to its authors existing solutions that will truly promote STM’s stated mission to “ensure that the benefits of scholarly research are reliably and broadly available.” From the letter:

We share a positive vision of enabling the flow of knowledge for the good of all. A vision that encompasses a world in which downstream communicators and curators can use research content in new ways, including creating translations, visualizations, and adaptations for diverse audiences. There is much work to do but the Creative Commons licenses already provide legal tools that are easy to understand, fit for the digital age, machine readable and consistently applied across content platforms.

So, what’s really wrong with the STM licenses? First, and most fundamentally, it is difficult to determine what each license and supplementary license is intended to do and how STM expects them each to be used. The Twelve Points to Make Open Access Licensing Work document attempts to explain its goals, but it is not at all clear how the various legal tools work to meet those objectives.

Second, none of the STM licenses comply with the Open Definition, as they all restrict commercial uses and derivatives to a significant extent. And they ignore the long-running benchmark for Open Access publishing: CC BY. CC BY is used by a majority of Open Access publishers, and is recommended as the optimal license for the publication, distribution, and reuse of scholarly work by the Budapest Open Access Initiative.

Third, the license terms and conditions introduce confusion and uncertainty into the world of open access publishing, a community in which the terminology and concepts utilized in CC’s standardized licenses are fairly well accepted and understood.

Fourth, the STM licenses claim to grant permission to do many things that re-users do not need permission to do, such as describing or linking to the licensed work. In addition, it’s questionable for STM to assume that text and data mining can be regulated by their licenses. Under the Creative Commons 4.0 licenses, a licensor grants the public permission to exercise rights under copyright, neighboring rights, and similar rights closely related to copyright (such as sui generis database rights). And the CC license only applies when at least one of these rights held by the licensor applies to the use made by the licensee. This is important because in some countries, text and data mining are activities covered by an exception or limitation to copyright (such as fair use in the United States), so no permission is needed. Most recently the United Kingdom enacted legislation specifically excepting noncommercial text and data mining from the reach of copyright.

Finally, STM’s “supplementary” licenses, which are intended for use with existing licenses, would only work with CC’s most restrictive license, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (BY-NC-ND). Even then they would have very limited legal effect, since much of what they claim to cover is already permitted by all CC licenses. As a practical matter, these license terms are likely to be very confusing to re-users when used in conjunction with a CC license.

The Creative Commons licenses are the demonstrated global standard for open access publishing. They’re used reliably by open access publishers around the world for sharing hundreds of thousands of research articles. Scholarly publishing presents a massive potential to increase our understanding of science. And creativity always builds on the past, whether it be a musician incorporating samples into a new composition or a cancer researcher re-using data from past experiments in their current work.

But to fully realize innovations in science, technology, and medicine, we need clear, universal legal terms so that a researcher can incorporate information from a variety of sources easily and effectively. The research community can enable these flows of information and promote discoveries by sharing writings, data, and analyses in the public commons. We’ve already built the legal tools to support content sharing. Let’s use them and not reinvent the wheel.

Questions should be directed to press@creativecommons.org.

Did Spain just declare war on the commons?

Planet CC -

Two weeks ago the lower chamber of the Spanish parliament approved a number of changes to Spain’s Intellectual Property Law that directly threaten the ability of Spanish internet users to contribute to the commons. The law introduces a number of modifications to copyright law that expand the scope of exclusive rights over areas that were […]

Creative Commons announces launch of CC Belarus

Planet CC -

Creative Commons leaflet / Sviatlana Yermakovich / CC BY-SA Creative Commons is happy to announce the launch of CC Belarus. Youth organization Falanster is now the belarusian Creative Commons affiliate team! On August 29, the official launch of CC Belarus will take place in Minsk. For now, CC Belarus will focus on the following topics: […]

Creative Commons announces launch of CC Belarus

Creativecommons.org -


Creative Commons leaflet / Sviatlana Yermakovich / CC BY-SA

Creative Commons is happy to announce the launch of CC Belarus. Youth organization Falanster is now the belarusian Creative Commons affiliate team!

On August 29, the official launch of CC Belarus will take place in Minsk. For now, CC Belarus will focus on the following topics:

  • researching the applicability of Creative Commons licenses in Belarusian legislation
  • connect with foreign teams to exchange experiences
  • organizing open discussions on adding Creative Commons licenses to Belarusian law
  • create a platform to discuss the reform of Belarusian Copyright Law
  • inform the Belarusian public about Creative Commons

Falanster began using Creative Commons licenses on its own sites (falanster.by, pirates.by, drupal-sliot.by), has been hosting meetings to endorse the open source principles, organised the Minsk Open Data Day in 2014, and has hosted several summer courses with lectures and panel discussions about copyright law and necessary reforms. Since 2013, Falanster has been holding Wiki-Days periodically, encouraging participants to add articles and photos to Wikipedia (Belarusian, Russian, English). The team has also been spreading information about Creative Commons through leaflets.

More about the CC Belarus team and contact information

School of Open Africa to launch in September

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(SOO logo here. Earth icon licensed CC BY by Erin Standley from the Noun Project.) After months of discussions, deliberations, and planning between CC staff, African Regional Coordinators, African Affiliate teams, and others in the open space, Creative Commons Africa is set to storm Africa by having a continent-wide launch for School of Open in […]

School of Open Africa to launch in September

Creativecommons.org -


(SOO logo here. Earth icon licensed CC BY by Erin Standley from the Noun Project.)

After months of discussions, deliberations, and planning between CC staff, African Regional Coordinators, African Affiliate teams, and others in the open space, Creative Commons Africa is set to storm Africa by having a continent-wide launch for School of Open in September.

School of Open is a global community of volunteers providing free online courses, face-to-face workshops, and innovative training programs on the meaning, application, and impact of “openness” in the digital age. Through School of Open, you can learn how to add a Creative Commons license to your work, find free resources for classroom use, open up your research, remix a music video, and more!

School of Open programs will be launched in Kenya, Tanzania, Nigeria, and South Africa in September on a series of topics ranging from Creative Commons licensing, intellectual property protection, open society concepts, and the Linux operating system .

Strategic collaborations are underway with the Mozilla Foundation, Nigerian Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, WikiAfrica, University of Lagos, University of Tanzania, and the Institute of Educational Management Technology of the Open University of Tanzania to make the launch a success.

School of Open Kenya  

School of Open Kenya already started out as a trail blazer by organizing a two-week after school program that introduces high school students to open culture through the use of online School of Open courses and related open educational resources (OER). The training was designed to satisfy the academic needs of the students and to enable the students to use open tools such as Creative Commons licenses to create and share knowledge, as well as learning required subjects in new and creative ways. The students integrated the School of Open training into their school work and were able to produce projects such as this Titration Demo video by the Lenana School under CC BY. Despite its long strides, Jamlab and CC Kenya are not resting their oars; they will be launching a Train the Trainers program this September where they will train 10+ community members to organize and run SOO workshops in more high schools and in neighboring countries. SOO Kenya will also host a SOO Africa launch event and Maker Party entitled PopJam. Jamlab + CC Kenya, in collaboration with Mozilla Kenya and Wikipedia Kenya, will host the event for 5 high schools in the region. Stay tuned for details!

School of Open South Africa  

CC South Africa hosts three projects under the School of Open initiative. The first is the #OpenAfrica project where in conjunction with WikiAfrica, open advocates from Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Malawi, Uganda and Ghana were put through an “open” bootcamp. The month-long camp covered Creative Commons, Wikipedia, Open Street Maps, Open Educational Resources (OER), Open Data, Open Government, and related fundraising and community building skills. Advocates returned equipped with “open” knowledge and skills to their home countries to influence and spur their communities into action. This has resulted in the creation of new CC affiliate teams in Ethiopia and Cote d’Ivoire and the launch of open mandated tech hubs in these communities.

Launching off #OpenAfrica, participants were invited to compete for the first Kumusha Bus stop. The Kumusha Bus is an African adaption of the South American Libre Bus. Ethiopia ‘won’ the first Kumusha Bus stop. The team spent four days inspiring, teaching and sharing at GIZ Headquarters in Addis Ababa. Participants from Sheger Media, AIESEC and Addis Ababa University were in attendance. The four days resulted in the launch of Project Luwi. Luwi is an open source project, aiming to increase the application of open source information and communication technologies (ICT). Luwi intends to create a local community of interested volunteers that is able to foster motivation and creativity around Open Educational Resources (OERs) and supports a culture of sharing information freely in Ethiopia.

The third project is the Creative Commons for Kids program (CC4Kids). CC4Kids was built with Obami, a South Africa-based social learning platform. The course is self-taught and takes about 45 minutes to complete. CC South Africa was invited to teach its first course as part of a Maker Party at the Code for Cape Town project (Code4CT) with 24 grade 10 and 11 girls from the Centre for Science and Technology (COSAT) in Cape Town, South Africa. For three weeks the girls were trained on how the web works and actively participated in building web content. Instead of policing students’ actions, CC4Kids teaches youth how to open and share their creative and educational works legally through the use of CC licenses. All the girls now have simple web pages they created. CC4Kids’ next Maker Party will be held at RLabs in August. Stay tuned!

School of Open Tanzania  

CC Tanzania is planning to host three sets of trainings. The first will be an ICT empowerment training for unemployed youth, the second will focus on teaching persons with disabilities how to use computers, and the third will focus on training educators on using ICT to improve how they teach their students. Participants will become new School of Open volunteers, improving and running future training programs as a way to give back to and grow their community. Development will be led by CC Tanzania volunteers with expertise in law, journalism, and information technology. CC Tanzania will host a joint SOO Africa launch event + Mozilla Maker Party, date and location TBD.

School of Open Nigeria  

CC Nigeria will, in five weekends, train participants on Nigerian copyright law, intellectual property protection, and the Linux operating system. The training will have two tracks: the first track being copyright law and the second being the Linux operating System. Participants will have the opportunity to choose either or both tracks. CC Nigeria also plans to host a joint SOO Africa launch event + Mozilla Maker Party during the training. During the event, experienced web users will train participants on easy ways to creating content using Mozilla tools.

SOO Nigeria links:

After the continent-wide launch, participants who attended the courses will have together obtained and built knowledge of open culture, IP protection and ICT skills.

Stay tuned to this blog or sign up for School of Open Announcements to be notified when each program launches in September! Learn more about how you can get involved with the School of Open at http://schoolofopen.org.

About Maker Party

School of Open and Creative Commons is excited to be partnering with Mozilla to celebrate teaching and learning the web with Maker Party. Through thousands of community-run events around the world, Maker Party unites educators, organizations and enthusiastic Internet users of all ages and skill levels.

We share Mozilla’s belief that the web is a global public resource that’s integral to modern life: it shapes how we learn, how we connect and how we communicate. But many of us don’t understand its basic mechanics or what it means to be a citizen of the web. That’s why we’re supporting this global effort to teach web literacy through hands-on learning and making with Maker Party.

About the School of Open

The School of Open is a global community of volunteers focused on providing free education opportunities on the meaning, application, and impact of “openness” in the digital age and its benefit to creative endeavors, education, and research. Volunteers develop and run online courses, offline workshops, and real world training programs on topics such as Creative Commons licenses, open educational resources, and sharing creative works. The School of Open is coordinated by Creative Commons and P2PU, a peer learning community for developing and running free online courses.

Przegląd linków CC #143

Planet CC -

Otwarta edukacja 1. David Willey rozwija zaproponowaną przez siebie definicja otwartości i porządkuje problemy otwartej edukacji takie jak niekompatybilność projektów z racji na różnice w licencjach jak i w złych standardach technicznych. 2. Clint Lalonde pisze o i zachęca do tworzenia osobistych historiach opowiadanych przez nauczycieli i edukatorów na temat wykorzystywania i tworzenia przez nich otwartych zasobów edukacyjnych. Zbiór takich historii prowadzi. […]

Generative acknowledgement

Planet CC -

Robin Sloan, The secret of Minecraft: And its challenge to the rest of us In the 2010s and beyond, it is not the case that every cultural product ought to be a generative, networked system. It is, I believe, the case that all the really important ones will be. Nathan Matias, Designing Acknowledgement on the […]

H Wattpad αναβαθμίστηκε σε έκδοση 4.0 των CC αδειών

Planet CC -

Η κοινότητα Wattpad αναβαθμίστηκε σε έκδοση 4.0 των Creative Commons αδειών  και παρουσίασε αρκετές βελτιώσεις στην εφαρμογή των CC. Η κοινότητα Wattpad είναι ένα μέρος για να ανακαλύψεις και να μοιραστείς ιστορίες: μια κοινωνική πλατφόρμα που συνδέει τους άνθρωπους μέσα από τις λέξεις. Με τη Wattpad, ο καθένας μπορεί να διαβάσει ή να γράψει από οποιαδήποτε συσκευή: τηλέφωνο, tablet ή υπολογιστή. Continue Reading

Rijksmuseum case study: Sharing free, high quality images without restrictions makes good things happen

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Girl in white kimono, George Hendrik Breitner, 1894; CC0 Yesterday Europeana published a great case study documenting the experiences of the Dutch Rijksmuseum in opening up access to their collection of digital public domain images. The case study was written by Joris Pekel, community coordinator for cultural heritage at the Europeana Foundation. Over the last […]

Rijksmuseum case study: Sharing free, high quality images without restrictions makes good things happen

Creativecommons.org -

Girl in white kimono, George Hendrik Breitner, 1894; CC0

Yesterday Europeana published a great case study documenting the experiences of the Dutch Rijksmuseum in opening up access to their collection of digital public domain images. The case study was written by Joris Pekel, community coordinator for cultural heritage at the Europeana Foundation. Over the last few years, Europeana has worked with the Rijksmuseum in order to make available at the highest quality possible images of public domain artworks held by the museum.

The report discusses the Rijksmuseum’s initial apprehension to sharing these high quality images of public domain works. The museum originally planned to share the digital reproductions of public domain works under an open license, such as the Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY). But after some convincing by organizations that advocate for unrestricted access to the public domain, the Rijksmuseum began to open its collections more by choosing to use the CC0 Public Domain Dedication for the digital reproductions.

The Rijksmuseum began to experiment with how it would offer high quality reproductions of the public domain artworks. The museum adopted a mission-driven approach, and staff understood the opportunity to showcase the best of the museum’s collection as a promotional tool. The marketing department argued that “…The core goal of the museum is to get the collection out and known to the public as much as possible…[and] the digital reproduction of an item would pique public interest in it, leading them to buy tickets to the museum to see the real deal.” The Rijksmuseum also realized that by releasing high quality digital reproductions of works out of copyright, it could help educate the public by providing true-color images and accurate metadata about the works.

Instead of worrying that making available high quality digital reproductions of public domain artwork for free would destroy a piece of the museum’s revenue stream, the Rijksmuseum initially adopted a hybrid approach. They made images available in two sizes: .jpg images at approximately 4500×4500 pixels were free, while the huge 200MB master .tiff files were made available for €40. The museum saw a steady increase in revenue from image sales, but eventually decided to discontinue the tiered offerings. Since October 2013 the Rijksmuseum has been releasing their highest quality images for free.

The Rijksmuseum has found a way to support broad access to its rich collection of cultural heritage resources. And it’s done so in such as way that promotes interest by new audiences, recuperates costs, and upholds the principles of supporting unrestricted access to the digital public domain.

Take a look at the full case study.

EU copyright consultation: Rights Holders are from Mars, Users are from Venus

Planet CC -

Last week the European Commission published its ‘Report on the responses to the Public Consultation on the Review of the EU Copyright Rules‘. This report summarizes the more than 11.000 responses that the Commission had received in reaction to the copyright consultation held between December 2013 and March of this year. While it is clear […]

Przegląd linków CC #142

Planet CC -

Otwarta edukacja i kultura 1. Dlaczego powinniśmy być otwarci? O argumentach za otwartością edukacji i danych oraz wystąpieniu komisarz ds. agendy cyfrowej Neelie Kroes podczas Open Knowlegde Fesitwal pisze The Learning Portal. Więcej informacji o otwartej edukacji podczas OKF znajdziecie na Open Education Europa. 2. Paul Stacey świetnie rozkłada problem ekonomii otwartości, a w szczególności otwartych zasobów edukacyjnych, która […]

EU anbefaler Creative Commons-lisenser for offentlig sektor

Planet CC -

Denne uken publiserte EU-kommisjonen nye retningslinjer for bruk av standard-lisenser i samband med publisering og gjenbruk av data og informasjon fra offentlig sektor. I disse anbefalingene oppfordres medlemsstatene eksplisitt til å bruke standardiserte åpne lisenser som Creative Commons for å lette bruk og gjenbruk av data og informasjon fra offentlig sektor. Samtidig advarer kommisjonen mot at det utvikles egne, spesielle lisenser. Slike lisenser kan gjøre det vanskelig å gjenbruke informasjon fra offentlig sektor og få til samvirke på tvers av grenser og sektorer. Kommisjonen skriver: En rekke lisenser, som følger prinsippene om «åpenhet» slik disse er beskrevet av Open Knowledge Foundation for å fremme ubegrenset gjenbruk av online-innhold, er tilgjengelig på nettet. De er blitt oversatt til mange språk, oppdateres sentralt og er allerede i utstrakt bruk over hele verden. Åpne standard-lisenser, som for eksempel de nyeste Creative Commons-lisenser (version 4.0), vil tillate gjenbruk av informasjon fra offentlig sektor uten behov for å utvikle og oppdatere skreddersydde lisenser på nasjonalt eller subnasjonalt nivå. Kilde: 2014/C 240/01. 2014-07-28T12:16:15Z Gisle Hannemyr

Free/Low Cost Intellectual Property Statutory Supplement

Planet CC -

Today, we are proud to announce the publication of our 2014 Intellectual Property  Statutory Supplement as a freely downloadable Open Course Book.   It offers the full text of the Federal Trademark, Copyright and Patent statutes (including edits detailing the changes made by the America Invents Act.)  It also has a number of important international [...]

Persnickety Snit

Planet CC -

This is the fourth in a series of postings of material drawn from our forthcoming, Creative Commons licensed, open coursebook on Intellectual Property.  It is about lawyers and language.  This is curmudgeonly but we cannot help ourselves. Computer Associates v. Altai is an excellent opinion.  A brilliant example of the judicial craft – defaced by [...]

Aanbeveling Europese Commissie: Gebruik CC-licenties voor de publieke sector informatie en data

Planet CC -

Op 17 juli heeft de Europese Commissie een aanbeveling gepubliceerd over licensering van Publieke Sector Informatie. De Commissie raadt de lidstaten van de Europese Unie aan om gestandaardiseerde open licenties te gebruiken voor het vrijgeven van Publieke Sector Informatie en gebruikt  Creative Commons-licenties expliciet als goed voorbeeld. Met Creative Commons-licenties geef je aan iedereen toestemming […]

2014 暑期實習生名單

Planet CC -

(依姓氏筆畫)李佳樺政治大學新聞系。很高興能成為「2014台灣創用CC計畫」的實習生,希望能藉由和不同專業背景的同學合作,嘗試各式型態的工作,獲得更多元的觀點和經驗。最初是在課堂上認識了創用CC授權的概念,因而開始對此議題產生興趣,期待能從這項計畫中認識公眾授權,並提升實質的策展、企劃能力。閱讀全文 2014-07-25T11:25:02Z guest

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